Using attribution theory to examine community rehabilitation provider stigma

David Strauser, Ayse Ciftci, Deirdre O'Sullivan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study builds on existing research investigating the stigma-reducing strategies specific to rehabilitation service providers by comparing differences in education levels and degree of contact among rehabilitation service providers. Rehabilitation service providers with master's level and bachelor level education showed significant differences in their stigmatizing tendencies on subscales of controllability and stability for different categories of disabilities. Specifically, service providers with a master's degree had more stigmatizing beliefs for psychosis and cocaine addiction, compared with service providers with a bachelor's degree. Service providers with either a bachelor's degree or master's degree reported lower levels of stigma overall for five of the six categories of disability compared with their community college student counterparts. No differences were found for length of time working with persons with psychiatric disabilities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-47
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Rehabilitation Research
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Mar 1

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Rehabilitation
Education
Cocaine-Related Disorders
Disabled Persons
Psychotic Disorders
Psychiatry
Students
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

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Using attribution theory to examine community rehabilitation provider stigma. / Strauser, David; Ciftci, Ayse; O'Sullivan, Deirdre.

In: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.03.2009, p. 41-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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