Toward a model of gender diversity in the workplace in East Asia: Preliminary evidence from manufacturing industries in Taiwan

I. Chieh Hsu, John J. Lawler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter examines gender diversity with a focus on the proportion of females in companies in Taiwan. The investigation also examines the effect of the proportion of females on company performance. The research used two Taiwan government databases offering statistics of individual indigenous companies in the manufacturing industries in 1996 and 2001, with a sample size of 8,622 in 1996 and 8,731 in 2001. Results show that the proportion of females in managerial, professional, and administrative jobs is increasing and is positively associated with company performance. By contrast, the proportion of females in operational-level jobs is decreasing, and its association with company performance is inconsistent. This study extends previous gender diversity research in management groups and suggests that women can be invaluable resources for business organizations in Taiwan.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Global Diffusion of Human Resource Practices
Subtitle of host publicationInstitutional and Cultural Limits
EditorsJohn Lawler, Greg Hundley
Pages171-190
Number of pages20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Jul 1

Publication series

NameAdvances in International Management
Volume21
ISSN (Print)1571-5027

Fingerprint

Manufacturing industries
Proportion
Taiwan
Work place
East Asia
Gender diversity
Company performance
Statistics
Data base
Resources
Government
Business organization
Sample size

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management

Cite this

Hsu, I. C., & Lawler, J. J. (2008). Toward a model of gender diversity in the workplace in East Asia: Preliminary evidence from manufacturing industries in Taiwan. In J. Lawler, & G. Hundley (Eds.), The Global Diffusion of Human Resource Practices: Institutional and Cultural Limits (pp. 171-190). (Advances in International Management; Vol. 21). https://doi.org/10.1016/S1571-5027(08)00007-7
Hsu, I. Chieh ; Lawler, John J. / Toward a model of gender diversity in the workplace in East Asia : Preliminary evidence from manufacturing industries in Taiwan. The Global Diffusion of Human Resource Practices: Institutional and Cultural Limits. editor / John Lawler ; Greg Hundley. 2008. pp. 171-190 (Advances in International Management).
@inbook{5303ccd8fd824076bf57e1432601c54f,
title = "Toward a model of gender diversity in the workplace in East Asia: Preliminary evidence from manufacturing industries in Taiwan",
abstract = "This chapter examines gender diversity with a focus on the proportion of females in companies in Taiwan. The investigation also examines the effect of the proportion of females on company performance. The research used two Taiwan government databases offering statistics of individual indigenous companies in the manufacturing industries in 1996 and 2001, with a sample size of 8,622 in 1996 and 8,731 in 2001. Results show that the proportion of females in managerial, professional, and administrative jobs is increasing and is positively associated with company performance. By contrast, the proportion of females in operational-level jobs is decreasing, and its association with company performance is inconsistent. This study extends previous gender diversity research in management groups and suggests that women can be invaluable resources for business organizations in Taiwan.",
author = "Hsu, {I. Chieh} and Lawler, {John J.}",
year = "2008",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S1571-5027(08)00007-7",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780762314010",
series = "Advances in International Management",
pages = "171--190",
editor = "John Lawler and Greg Hundley",
booktitle = "The Global Diffusion of Human Resource Practices",

}

Hsu, IC & Lawler, JJ 2008, Toward a model of gender diversity in the workplace in East Asia: Preliminary evidence from manufacturing industries in Taiwan. in J Lawler & G Hundley (eds), The Global Diffusion of Human Resource Practices: Institutional and Cultural Limits. Advances in International Management, vol. 21, pp. 171-190. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1571-5027(08)00007-7

Toward a model of gender diversity in the workplace in East Asia : Preliminary evidence from manufacturing industries in Taiwan. / Hsu, I. Chieh; Lawler, John J.

The Global Diffusion of Human Resource Practices: Institutional and Cultural Limits. ed. / John Lawler; Greg Hundley. 2008. p. 171-190 (Advances in International Management; Vol. 21).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

TY - CHAP

T1 - Toward a model of gender diversity in the workplace in East Asia

T2 - Preliminary evidence from manufacturing industries in Taiwan

AU - Hsu, I. Chieh

AU - Lawler, John J.

PY - 2008/7/1

Y1 - 2008/7/1

N2 - This chapter examines gender diversity with a focus on the proportion of females in companies in Taiwan. The investigation also examines the effect of the proportion of females on company performance. The research used two Taiwan government databases offering statistics of individual indigenous companies in the manufacturing industries in 1996 and 2001, with a sample size of 8,622 in 1996 and 8,731 in 2001. Results show that the proportion of females in managerial, professional, and administrative jobs is increasing and is positively associated with company performance. By contrast, the proportion of females in operational-level jobs is decreasing, and its association with company performance is inconsistent. This study extends previous gender diversity research in management groups and suggests that women can be invaluable resources for business organizations in Taiwan.

AB - This chapter examines gender diversity with a focus on the proportion of females in companies in Taiwan. The investigation also examines the effect of the proportion of females on company performance. The research used two Taiwan government databases offering statistics of individual indigenous companies in the manufacturing industries in 1996 and 2001, with a sample size of 8,622 in 1996 and 8,731 in 2001. Results show that the proportion of females in managerial, professional, and administrative jobs is increasing and is positively associated with company performance. By contrast, the proportion of females in operational-level jobs is decreasing, and its association with company performance is inconsistent. This study extends previous gender diversity research in management groups and suggests that women can be invaluable resources for business organizations in Taiwan.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=45849135249&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=45849135249&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1571-5027(08)00007-7

DO - 10.1016/S1571-5027(08)00007-7

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:45849135249

SN - 9780762314010

T3 - Advances in International Management

SP - 171

EP - 190

BT - The Global Diffusion of Human Resource Practices

A2 - Lawler, John

A2 - Hundley, Greg

ER -

Hsu IC, Lawler JJ. Toward a model of gender diversity in the workplace in East Asia: Preliminary evidence from manufacturing industries in Taiwan. In Lawler J, Hundley G, editors, The Global Diffusion of Human Resource Practices: Institutional and Cultural Limits. 2008. p. 171-190. (Advances in International Management). https://doi.org/10.1016/S1571-5027(08)00007-7