Time Spent on Social Network Sites and Psychological Well-Being: A Meta-Analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This meta-analysis examines the relationship between time spent on social networking sites and psychological well-being factors, namely self-esteem, life satisfaction, loneliness, and depression. Sixty-one studies consisting of 67 independent samples involving 19,652 participants were identified. The mean correlation between time spent on social networking sites and psychological well-being was low at r = -0.07. The correlations between time spent on social networking sites and positive indicators (self-esteem and life satisfaction) were close to 0, whereas those between time spent on social networking sites and negative indicators (depression and loneliness) were weak. The effects of publication outlet, site on which users spent time, scale of time spent, and participant age and gender were not significant. As most included studies used student samples, future research should be conducted to examine this relationship for adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)346-354
Number of pages9
JournalCyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking
Volume20
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Jun

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Communication
  • Applied Psychology
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Science Applications

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Time Spent on Social Network Sites and Psychological Well-Being: A Meta-Analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this