The illumination characteristics of glass-based Mazu temple buildings compared to traditional temples in Taiwan

Chao Shui Lin, Chun Hung Hu, Peng Lai Chen, Tsair Rong Chen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The role of religion in providing people spiritual stability and the necessity for conducting worships has increased the demands of religious buildings. Taoist religious buildings have a significant presence in Taiwan. With increasing environmental awareness and declining wood production, current constructions of Taoist buildings have shifted from using wood to employing reinforced concrete as building material. However, insufficient indoor lighting results in buildings requiring artificial lighting, which in turn leads to energy consumption. Therefore, a glass-based material Mazu temple is proposed to substitute wood and reinforced concrete material. The design consideration for building is illustrated in this paper. Furthermore, the illumination of the Mazu temple constructed will is analyzed and compared to a traditional Taoist temple building. The results show that the illumination of glass-based temple buildings is better than traditional temple buliding. Hence, it could reduce the require time of artificial lighting.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEnergy and Power Technology
Pages1616-1619
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Oct 29
Event2013 International Conference on Advances in Energy and Environmental Science, ICAEES 2013 - Guangzhou, China
Duration: 2013 Jul 302013 Jul 31

Publication series

NameAdvanced Materials Research
Volume805-806
ISSN (Print)1022-6680

Other

Other2013 International Conference on Advances in Energy and Environmental Science, ICAEES 2013
CountryChina
CityGuangzhou
Period13-07-3013-07-31

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

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