The clinical utility of the chen internet addiction scale—gaming version, for internet gaming disorder in the DSM-5 among young adults

Chih Hung Ko, Sue Huei Chen, Chih Hung Wang, Wen Xiang Tsai, Ju Yu Yen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) includes the diagnostic criteria for Internet gaming disorder (IGD). This study evaluated (1) the screening, diagnostic, and prevalence-estimated cutoff points of the Chen Internet Addiction Scale–Gaming Version (CIAS-G) for IGD in the DSM-5; and (2) the differences in the CIAS-G and subscale scores among individuals with IGD, regular gamers (RGs), and other control subjects. Methods: We recruited 69 participants with IGD, 69 RGs, and 69 healthy participants based on diagnostic interviews conducted by a psychiatrist according to DSM-5 IGD criteria. All participants completed the CIAS-G and were assessed using the clinical global impression scale. Results: The optimal screening and diagnostic cutoff points were 68 or more (sensitivity, 97.1%; specificity, 76.8%) and 72 or more (sensitivity, 85.5%; specificity, 87.0%) for IGD based on DSM-5 criteria, respectively. The 76 or more cutoff point had the highest number needed to misdiagnose and was the optimal prevalence estimated cutoff point. Conclusions: The screening cutoff point could be used to identify individuals with IGD for further diagnostic interviewing to confirm the diagnosis in the clinical setting or for two-stage epidemiological evaluation. The diagnostic cutoff point provides a provisional diagnosis of IGD when diagnostic interviewing is unavailable. The prevalence-estimated cutoff point could be used to estimate the prevalence of IGD in large-scale epidemiological investigations when further diagnostic interviewing is impractical. The clinical and epidemiological utility of CIAS-G warrants further study.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4141
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume16
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Nov

Fingerprint

Internet
Young Adult
Diagnostic Errors
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Psychiatry
Healthy Volunteers
Interviews

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

@article{2bc2149e4c834ef8821403cfc4c88695,
title = "The clinical utility of the chen internet addiction scale—gaming version, for internet gaming disorder in the DSM-5 among young adults",
abstract = "Objectives: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) includes the diagnostic criteria for Internet gaming disorder (IGD). This study evaluated (1) the screening, diagnostic, and prevalence-estimated cutoff points of the Chen Internet Addiction Scale–Gaming Version (CIAS-G) for IGD in the DSM-5; and (2) the differences in the CIAS-G and subscale scores among individuals with IGD, regular gamers (RGs), and other control subjects. Methods: We recruited 69 participants with IGD, 69 RGs, and 69 healthy participants based on diagnostic interviews conducted by a psychiatrist according to DSM-5 IGD criteria. All participants completed the CIAS-G and were assessed using the clinical global impression scale. Results: The optimal screening and diagnostic cutoff points were 68 or more (sensitivity, 97.1{\%}; specificity, 76.8{\%}) and 72 or more (sensitivity, 85.5{\%}; specificity, 87.0{\%}) for IGD based on DSM-5 criteria, respectively. The 76 or more cutoff point had the highest number needed to misdiagnose and was the optimal prevalence estimated cutoff point. Conclusions: The screening cutoff point could be used to identify individuals with IGD for further diagnostic interviewing to confirm the diagnosis in the clinical setting or for two-stage epidemiological evaluation. The diagnostic cutoff point provides a provisional diagnosis of IGD when diagnostic interviewing is unavailable. The prevalence-estimated cutoff point could be used to estimate the prevalence of IGD in large-scale epidemiological investigations when further diagnostic interviewing is impractical. The clinical and epidemiological utility of CIAS-G warrants further study.",
author = "Ko, {Chih Hung} and Chen, {Sue Huei} and Wang, {Chih Hung} and Tsai, {Wen Xiang} and Yen, {Ju Yu}",
year = "2019",
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doi = "10.3390/ijerph16214141",
language = "English",
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The clinical utility of the chen internet addiction scale—gaming version, for internet gaming disorder in the DSM-5 among young adults. / Ko, Chih Hung; Chen, Sue Huei; Wang, Chih Hung; Tsai, Wen Xiang; Yen, Ju Yu.

In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol. 16, No. 21, 4141, 11.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - The clinical utility of the chen internet addiction scale—gaming version, for internet gaming disorder in the DSM-5 among young adults

AU - Ko, Chih Hung

AU - Chen, Sue Huei

AU - Wang, Chih Hung

AU - Tsai, Wen Xiang

AU - Yen, Ju Yu

PY - 2019/11

Y1 - 2019/11

N2 - Objectives: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) includes the diagnostic criteria for Internet gaming disorder (IGD). This study evaluated (1) the screening, diagnostic, and prevalence-estimated cutoff points of the Chen Internet Addiction Scale–Gaming Version (CIAS-G) for IGD in the DSM-5; and (2) the differences in the CIAS-G and subscale scores among individuals with IGD, regular gamers (RGs), and other control subjects. Methods: We recruited 69 participants with IGD, 69 RGs, and 69 healthy participants based on diagnostic interviews conducted by a psychiatrist according to DSM-5 IGD criteria. All participants completed the CIAS-G and were assessed using the clinical global impression scale. Results: The optimal screening and diagnostic cutoff points were 68 or more (sensitivity, 97.1%; specificity, 76.8%) and 72 or more (sensitivity, 85.5%; specificity, 87.0%) for IGD based on DSM-5 criteria, respectively. The 76 or more cutoff point had the highest number needed to misdiagnose and was the optimal prevalence estimated cutoff point. Conclusions: The screening cutoff point could be used to identify individuals with IGD for further diagnostic interviewing to confirm the diagnosis in the clinical setting or for two-stage epidemiological evaluation. The diagnostic cutoff point provides a provisional diagnosis of IGD when diagnostic interviewing is unavailable. The prevalence-estimated cutoff point could be used to estimate the prevalence of IGD in large-scale epidemiological investigations when further diagnostic interviewing is impractical. The clinical and epidemiological utility of CIAS-G warrants further study.

AB - Objectives: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) includes the diagnostic criteria for Internet gaming disorder (IGD). This study evaluated (1) the screening, diagnostic, and prevalence-estimated cutoff points of the Chen Internet Addiction Scale–Gaming Version (CIAS-G) for IGD in the DSM-5; and (2) the differences in the CIAS-G and subscale scores among individuals with IGD, regular gamers (RGs), and other control subjects. Methods: We recruited 69 participants with IGD, 69 RGs, and 69 healthy participants based on diagnostic interviews conducted by a psychiatrist according to DSM-5 IGD criteria. All participants completed the CIAS-G and were assessed using the clinical global impression scale. Results: The optimal screening and diagnostic cutoff points were 68 or more (sensitivity, 97.1%; specificity, 76.8%) and 72 or more (sensitivity, 85.5%; specificity, 87.0%) for IGD based on DSM-5 criteria, respectively. The 76 or more cutoff point had the highest number needed to misdiagnose and was the optimal prevalence estimated cutoff point. Conclusions: The screening cutoff point could be used to identify individuals with IGD for further diagnostic interviewing to confirm the diagnosis in the clinical setting or for two-stage epidemiological evaluation. The diagnostic cutoff point provides a provisional diagnosis of IGD when diagnostic interviewing is unavailable. The prevalence-estimated cutoff point could be used to estimate the prevalence of IGD in large-scale epidemiological investigations when further diagnostic interviewing is impractical. The clinical and epidemiological utility of CIAS-G warrants further study.

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JF - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

SN - 1661-7827

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