Self-stigma, stages of change and psychosocial treatment adherence among chinese people with schizophrenia: A path analysis

Kelvin M.T. Fung, Hector W.H. Tsang, Fong Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Mental illness stigma is one of the key causes for poor psychosocial treatment adherence. The: objective of this study was to explore the link between self-stigmatization and adherence via path analysis with insight and readiness for change conceptualized as the possible mediators. The direct effects of psychopathology causing nonadherence were also tested. Method: One hundred and five participants with schizophrenia were recruited from five psychiatric settings in Hong Kong. Data concerning their level of stigma, insight, stages of change, psychopathology, and psychosocial treatment adherence were collected. Path analysis was used to test two hypothetical models. Results: The findings supported the direct effects of selfstigma on reducing psychosocial treatment adherence, and its indirect influences mediated by insight and stages of change on treatment adherence. Psychopathology was also found to have a direct effect on undermining adherence. This model showed better model fit than the one which did not consider the direct effects of self-stigmatization and psychopathology. Conclusion: To conclude, this study deepened our understanding on the mechanism explaining how selfstigmatization undermines psychosocial treatment adherence. The findings provide direct implications on ways of formulating a self-stigma reduction program to combat self-stigma and its negative consequences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)561-568
Number of pages8
JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Volume45
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 May 1

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path analysis
psychopathology
schizophrenia
Schizophrenia
Psychopathology
stigmatization
Stereotyping
Therapeutics
mental illness
Hong Kong
Psychiatry
cause

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Self-stigma, stages of change and psychosocial treatment adherence among chinese people with schizophrenia : A path analysis. / Fung, Kelvin M.T.; Tsang, Hector W.H.; Chan, Fong.

In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, Vol. 45, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. 561-568.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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