Predictors of perceived social effectiveness of individuals with serious mental illness

Jennifer Sánchez, Connie Sung, Brian N. Phillips, Molly K. Tschopp, Veronica Muller, Hui Ling Lee, Fong Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Social effectiveness continues to play a critical role in recovery of people with serious mental illness (SMI), with greater social effectiveness predicting many positive life outcomes. Despite the abundance of literature supporting the relationship between perceptions and behavior, little is known about predictors of perceived social effectiveness of individuals with SMI. Methods: The purpose of this study is to examine the predictors of perceived social effectiveness of individuals with SMI. Crosssectional data of 192 participants with SMI recruited from four psychiatric rehabilitation clubhouses in 2 states in the South and Midwest regions of the United States were used for this study. Self-report data on category of psychiatric disabilities, psychiatric symptoms, cognition, insight, educational attainment, empathy, interpersonal interactions and relationships, self-stigma, disability acceptance, and perceived social effectiveness were collected and analyzed using multiple regression analysis (MRA). Results: MRA yielded a regression model that accounted for 56% of the variance in perceived social effectiveness, which is considered a large effect size. Controlling for all other factors, mood disorder, educational attainment, empathy, interpersonal interactions and relationships, and disability acceptance were found to be significant predictors of perceived social effectiveness of persons with SMI. Conclusions and Implications for Practice: Practitioners should consider determining points of intervention and targeting specific elements that enhance perceived social effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)88-99
Number of pages12
JournalPsychiatric Rehabilitation Journal
Volume42
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Psychiatry
Regression Analysis
Social Distance
Mood Disorders
Self Report
Cognition
Psychiatric Rehabilitation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health Professions (miscellaneous)
  • Rehabilitation
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Sánchez, Jennifer ; Sung, Connie ; Phillips, Brian N. ; Tschopp, Molly K. ; Muller, Veronica ; Lee, Hui Ling ; Chan, Fong. / Predictors of perceived social effectiveness of individuals with serious mental illness. In: Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal. 2019 ; Vol. 42, No. 1. pp. 88-99.
@article{b991534c90954e778add323bf433e6d4,
title = "Predictors of perceived social effectiveness of individuals with serious mental illness",
abstract = "Objective: Social effectiveness continues to play a critical role in recovery of people with serious mental illness (SMI), with greater social effectiveness predicting many positive life outcomes. Despite the abundance of literature supporting the relationship between perceptions and behavior, little is known about predictors of perceived social effectiveness of individuals with SMI. Methods: The purpose of this study is to examine the predictors of perceived social effectiveness of individuals with SMI. Crosssectional data of 192 participants with SMI recruited from four psychiatric rehabilitation clubhouses in 2 states in the South and Midwest regions of the United States were used for this study. Self-report data on category of psychiatric disabilities, psychiatric symptoms, cognition, insight, educational attainment, empathy, interpersonal interactions and relationships, self-stigma, disability acceptance, and perceived social effectiveness were collected and analyzed using multiple regression analysis (MRA). Results: MRA yielded a regression model that accounted for 56{\%} of the variance in perceived social effectiveness, which is considered a large effect size. Controlling for all other factors, mood disorder, educational attainment, empathy, interpersonal interactions and relationships, and disability acceptance were found to be significant predictors of perceived social effectiveness of persons with SMI. Conclusions and Implications for Practice: Practitioners should consider determining points of intervention and targeting specific elements that enhance perceived social effectiveness.",
author = "Jennifer S{\'a}nchez and Connie Sung and Phillips, {Brian N.} and Tschopp, {Molly K.} and Veronica Muller and Lee, {Hui Ling} and Fong Chan",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/prj0000321",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "88--99",
journal = "Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal",
issn = "1095-158X",
publisher = "Boston University",
number = "1",

}

Predictors of perceived social effectiveness of individuals with serious mental illness. / Sánchez, Jennifer; Sung, Connie; Phillips, Brian N.; Tschopp, Molly K.; Muller, Veronica; Lee, Hui Ling; Chan, Fong.

In: Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal, Vol. 42, No. 1, 01.03.2019, p. 88-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictors of perceived social effectiveness of individuals with serious mental illness

AU - Sánchez, Jennifer

AU - Sung, Connie

AU - Phillips, Brian N.

AU - Tschopp, Molly K.

AU - Muller, Veronica

AU - Lee, Hui Ling

AU - Chan, Fong

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - Objective: Social effectiveness continues to play a critical role in recovery of people with serious mental illness (SMI), with greater social effectiveness predicting many positive life outcomes. Despite the abundance of literature supporting the relationship between perceptions and behavior, little is known about predictors of perceived social effectiveness of individuals with SMI. Methods: The purpose of this study is to examine the predictors of perceived social effectiveness of individuals with SMI. Crosssectional data of 192 participants with SMI recruited from four psychiatric rehabilitation clubhouses in 2 states in the South and Midwest regions of the United States were used for this study. Self-report data on category of psychiatric disabilities, psychiatric symptoms, cognition, insight, educational attainment, empathy, interpersonal interactions and relationships, self-stigma, disability acceptance, and perceived social effectiveness were collected and analyzed using multiple regression analysis (MRA). Results: MRA yielded a regression model that accounted for 56% of the variance in perceived social effectiveness, which is considered a large effect size. Controlling for all other factors, mood disorder, educational attainment, empathy, interpersonal interactions and relationships, and disability acceptance were found to be significant predictors of perceived social effectiveness of persons with SMI. Conclusions and Implications for Practice: Practitioners should consider determining points of intervention and targeting specific elements that enhance perceived social effectiveness.

AB - Objective: Social effectiveness continues to play a critical role in recovery of people with serious mental illness (SMI), with greater social effectiveness predicting many positive life outcomes. Despite the abundance of literature supporting the relationship between perceptions and behavior, little is known about predictors of perceived social effectiveness of individuals with SMI. Methods: The purpose of this study is to examine the predictors of perceived social effectiveness of individuals with SMI. Crosssectional data of 192 participants with SMI recruited from four psychiatric rehabilitation clubhouses in 2 states in the South and Midwest regions of the United States were used for this study. Self-report data on category of psychiatric disabilities, psychiatric symptoms, cognition, insight, educational attainment, empathy, interpersonal interactions and relationships, self-stigma, disability acceptance, and perceived social effectiveness were collected and analyzed using multiple regression analysis (MRA). Results: MRA yielded a regression model that accounted for 56% of the variance in perceived social effectiveness, which is considered a large effect size. Controlling for all other factors, mood disorder, educational attainment, empathy, interpersonal interactions and relationships, and disability acceptance were found to be significant predictors of perceived social effectiveness of persons with SMI. Conclusions and Implications for Practice: Practitioners should consider determining points of intervention and targeting specific elements that enhance perceived social effectiveness.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053816252&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053816252&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/prj0000321

DO - 10.1037/prj0000321

M3 - Article

C2 - 30265067

AN - SCOPUS:85053816252

VL - 42

SP - 88

EP - 99

JO - Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal

JF - Psychiatric Rehabilitation Journal

SN - 1095-158X

IS - 1

ER -