Predictors of life satisfaction in individuals with intellectual disabilities

Susan M. Miller, Fong Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to examine factors that predict life satisfaction in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). Two groups of variables were studied: life skills (interpersonal, instrumental and leisure) and higher-order predictors (social support, self-determination and productivity). Method: Fifty-six participants with ID were recruited from two community agencies in Wisconsin. Data were collected using both a self-report inventory, which was administered to each individual in an interview format, and a behaviour rating scale, which was completed by a knowledgeable staff member. Hierarchical regression was used to analyse the data. Results: Both sets of variables were found to explain a significant amount of the variance in life satisfaction. Within the sets, social support and interpersonal skills were individually significantly associated with life satisfaction. Conclusion: It is hoped that the results of this study will help support providers organise services in such a way that maximises the life satisfaction of the consumers that they serve.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1039-1047
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume52
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Nov 28

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Intellectual Disability
Social Support
Personal Autonomy
Leisure Activities
Self Report
Life Satisfaction
Predictors
Interviews
Equipment and Supplies
Social Skills

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Predictors of life satisfaction in individuals with intellectual disabilities. / Miller, Susan M.; Chan, Fong.

In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, Vol. 52, No. 12, 28.11.2008, p. 1039-1047.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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