Mean-level change in self-esteem from childhood through adulthood: Meta-analysis of longitudinal studies

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62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study performs a meta-analysis of the mean-level of change in self-esteem across the life span. Fifty-nine studies yielded data from 130 independent samples. Results indicate that, despite slightly increasing from childhood to the first decade of young adulthood, self-esteem does not change beyond 30 years old. Self-esteem changes the most during the first decade of young adulthood. The effects of gender and time span between assessments on change in self-esteem were minimal during adolescence, while the way self-esteem is measured significantly affects change. The mean effect size was the largest with the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory and the smallest with Harter's Self-Perception Profile. Birth cohort also significantly influences change, whereas older cohorts change to a smaller extent compared to younger cohorts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)251-260
Number of pages10
JournalReview of General Psychology
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010 Sep 1

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Self Concept
Longitudinal Studies
Meta-Analysis
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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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Mean-level change in self-esteem from childhood through adulthood : Meta-analysis of longitudinal studies. / Huang, Chiung-jung.

In: Review of General Psychology, Vol. 14, No. 3, 01.09.2010, p. 251-260.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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