Lifestyles and Mortality in Taiwan: An 11-Year Follow-up Study

Yen Huai Lin, Po Wen Ku, Pesus Chou

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The associations of modifiable lifestyle-related factors with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality were examined in a population-based sample of older Taiwanese people. A total of 4176 individuals aged 50 years and older, with 11 years of follow-up, were analyzed. Current and former smokers had a higher risk of all-cause mortality compared with never smokers ([HR = 1.33; 95% CI = 1.12, 1.58], [HR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.16, 1.68]). Low intake of vegetables and fruits was associated with a significantly higher risk of 1.43 (95% CI = 1.13, 1.81) for cardiovascular mortality and 1.22 (95% CI = 1.09, 1.38) for all-cause mortality. The low physical activity group at baseline who became part of the low, moderate, and high physical activity groups during follow-up had the following risks of cardiovascular mortality: ([HR = 2.89; 95% CI = 1.91, 4.36], [HR = 2.17; 95% CI = 1.29, 3.63], [HR = 1.59; 95% CI = 0.90, 2.82]). Similarly, the moderate physical activity group at baseline who became part of the low, moderate, and high physical activity groups during follow-up had the following risks of cardiovascular mortality: ([HR = 3.52; 95% CI = 2.14, 5.80], [HR = 2.25; 95% CI = 1.34, 3.80], [HR = 1.44; 95% CI = 0.78, 2.66]). The same tendencies were found in all-cause mortality. Smoking, diet, and physical activity were significantly modifiable lifestyle-related factors for mortality.Besides, individuals who decreased their physical activity had a significantly higher risk, whereas those who increased their physical activity had a significantly lower risk.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-267
Number of pages9
JournalAsia-Pacific Journal of Public Health
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 May 1

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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