Leveling up: Are non-gamers and women disadvantaged in a virtual world classroom?

Clyde A. Warden, James Stanworth, Chi Cheng Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Today's young gamers are tomorrow's students who expect more immersion from their online learning experiences. Teachers and administrators, however, must ask are some students at a disadvantage in such a class and does gender play a role? We examine the degree to which gaming experience and gender influence sense of presence in a virtual world learning classroom. Feelings of presence are key to involvement in virtual worlds. Participants, 348 undergraduates, interacted within a custom designed virtual world classroom focusing business negotiation skills. Results reveal that while gaming experience gives a slight advantage, lack of previous software ownership and gender do not put learners at a disadvantage. This finding shows that non-gamers and females can equally participate in a virtual world classroom, relieving concerns of adoption.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)210-219
Number of pages10
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume65
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016 Dec 1

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Vulnerable Populations
Students
Learning
Ownership
Negotiating
Immersion
Administrative Personnel
Emotions
Software
Industry
Leveling
Virtual Worlds
Gaming

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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Leveling up : Are non-gamers and women disadvantaged in a virtual world classroom? / Warden, Clyde A.; Stanworth, James; Chang, Chi Cheng.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 65, 01.12.2016, p. 210-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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