Internet use and psychological well-being

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The direction of the correlation between Internet use and psychological well-being is debatable. The displacement hypothesis indicates the correlation is negative, as Internet use for communication replaces face-to face-interaction. Conversely, the augmentation hypothesis suggests that the correlation is positive because Internet use for communication complements existing social interaction. While previous empirical findings about the relationship between Internet use and psychological well-being have been diverse, two previous meta-analyses and the present meta-analysis about the use of social networking sites and psychological well-being supported neither position, and found no relationship between Internet use and psychological well-being. Investigation of causal predominance between Internet use and psychological well-being, increased attention to measurement problems of social networking site use and older adults, and consideration of effects of indicators and moderators should be addressed in future research.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEncyclopedia of Cyber Behavior
PublisherIGI Global
Pages302-314
Number of pages13
Volume1
ISBN (Print)9781466603158
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Dec 1

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well-being
Internet
networking
communication
interaction
moderator
present

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Huang, C. (2012). Internet use and psychological well-being. In Encyclopedia of Cyber Behavior (Vol. 1, pp. 302-314). IGI Global. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-0315-8.ch026
Huang, Chiung-jung. / Internet use and psychological well-being. Encyclopedia of Cyber Behavior. Vol. 1 IGI Global, 2012. pp. 302-314
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Huang, C 2012, Internet use and psychological well-being. in Encyclopedia of Cyber Behavior. vol. 1, IGI Global, pp. 302-314. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-0315-8.ch026

Internet use and psychological well-being. / Huang, Chiung-jung.

Encyclopedia of Cyber Behavior. Vol. 1 IGI Global, 2012. p. 302-314.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Huang C. Internet use and psychological well-being. In Encyclopedia of Cyber Behavior. Vol. 1. IGI Global. 2012. p. 302-314 https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-0315-8.ch026