Image design for enhancing science learning: Helping students build taxonomic meanings with salient tree structure images

Yun Ping Ge, Len Unsworth, Kuo Hua Wang, Huey Por Chang

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Drawing on cognitive theories of graphic comprehension and on systemic functional semiotics, the intention of this study is twofold: first, to examine the effects of image design on reading comprehension of science texts; second, to investigate the process of meaning-making when reading image and verbal text. An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that image designs with salient tree structure can cue better reading comprehension about the concept of the biological classification system. A 5-phase interview was developed to investigate the reading comprehension in different textual conditions. 12 Taiwanese students from year 7 were assigned as the participants either in a control group to read the text with the textbook images or in a treatment group to read the same texts but with a salient tree structure image designed to be more coherent with the textual information. The participants are further identified in terms of low, medium, and high level of prior knowledge on the topic according to a pretest. The results support the hypothesis which shows the textbook image did not efficiently activate as many theme-related meanings as the tree-structure one. Moreover, there are many misunderstandings embedded in the design of the textbook image which might also be potential risks for the other readers. The influence of prior knowledge on the reading comprehension was negligible. Implications are drawn for the importance of image design in textbooks and biology pedagogy, and value of extended large-scale research in this area.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGlobal Developments in Literacy Research for Science Education
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages237-258
Number of pages22
ISBN (Electronic)9783319691978
ISBN (Print)9783319691961
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018 Jan 19

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comprehension
science
learning
textbook
student
large-scale research
cognitive theory
semiotics
knowledge
biology
Group
experiment
interview
Values

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Ge, Y. P., Unsworth, L., Wang, K. H., & Chang, H. P. (2018). Image design for enhancing science learning: Helping students build taxonomic meanings with salient tree structure images. In Global Developments in Literacy Research for Science Education (pp. 237-258). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69197-8_15
Ge, Yun Ping ; Unsworth, Len ; Wang, Kuo Hua ; Chang, Huey Por. / Image design for enhancing science learning : Helping students build taxonomic meanings with salient tree structure images. Global Developments in Literacy Research for Science Education. Springer International Publishing, 2018. pp. 237-258
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Ge, YP, Unsworth, L, Wang, KH & Chang, HP 2018, Image design for enhancing science learning: Helping students build taxonomic meanings with salient tree structure images. in Global Developments in Literacy Research for Science Education. Springer International Publishing, pp. 237-258. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69197-8_15

Image design for enhancing science learning : Helping students build taxonomic meanings with salient tree structure images. / Ge, Yun Ping; Unsworth, Len; Wang, Kuo Hua; Chang, Huey Por.

Global Developments in Literacy Research for Science Education. Springer International Publishing, 2018. p. 237-258.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Ge YP, Unsworth L, Wang KH, Chang HP. Image design for enhancing science learning: Helping students build taxonomic meanings with salient tree structure images. In Global Developments in Literacy Research for Science Education. Springer International Publishing. 2018. p. 237-258 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69197-8_15