Hierarchical coping: A conceptual framework for understanding coping within the context of chronic illness and disability

Julie Chronister, Fong Chan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A considerable amount of interest in the construct coping has occurred over the past several decades (Billings &Moos, 1981; Byrne, 1964; Carver, Scheier, &Weintraub, 1989; Krohne, 1996; Lazarus &Folkman, 1984; Mullen &Suls, 1982; Pearlin &Schooler, 1978; Roth &Cohen, 1986). Emerging from the literature is a broad and complex conceptualization of coping, which generally refers to an array of dispositions, strategies, or efforts that people draw on or utilize, when faced with life stressors, in order to increase a sense of well-being and to avoid being harmed by stressful demands. Definitions of the construct encompass a range of personal dispositions, including stable and enduring traits, habitual styles or behavioral patterns, as well as situation-specific cognitive and behavioral efforts that are applied in a given circumstance. The most frequentlycited hypothesis is that coping - in any form - albeit a disposition, style, or effort, is a mediator or moderator of stress and well-being, which explains, in part, the persistent and theoretically- troubling, weak association between stress and well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCoping with Chronic Illness and Disability
Subtitle of host publicationTheoretical, Empirical, and Clinical Aspects
PublisherSpringer US
Pages49-71
Number of pages23
ISBN (Print)9780387486680
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Dec 1

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Chronic Disease

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Chronister, J., & Chan, F. (2007). Hierarchical coping: A conceptual framework for understanding coping within the context of chronic illness and disability. In Coping with Chronic Illness and Disability: Theoretical, Empirical, and Clinical Aspects (pp. 49-71). Springer US. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-48670-3_3
Chronister, Julie ; Chan, Fong. / Hierarchical coping : A conceptual framework for understanding coping within the context of chronic illness and disability. Coping with Chronic Illness and Disability: Theoretical, Empirical, and Clinical Aspects. Springer US, 2007. pp. 49-71
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Chronister, J & Chan, F 2007, Hierarchical coping: A conceptual framework for understanding coping within the context of chronic illness and disability. in Coping with Chronic Illness and Disability: Theoretical, Empirical, and Clinical Aspects. Springer US, pp. 49-71. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-48670-3_3

Hierarchical coping : A conceptual framework for understanding coping within the context of chronic illness and disability. / Chronister, Julie; Chan, Fong.

Coping with Chronic Illness and Disability: Theoretical, Empirical, and Clinical Aspects. Springer US, 2007. p. 49-71.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Chronister J, Chan F. Hierarchical coping: A conceptual framework for understanding coping within the context of chronic illness and disability. In Coping with Chronic Illness and Disability: Theoretical, Empirical, and Clinical Aspects. Springer US. 2007. p. 49-71 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-48670-3_3