Gender differences in academic self-efficacy: A meta-analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A meta-analysis of 187 studies containing 247 independent studies (N = 68,429) on gender differences in academic self-efficacy identified an overall effect size of 0.08, with a small difference favoring males. Moderator analysis demonstrated that content domain was a significant moderator in explaining effect size variation. Females displayed higher language arts self-efficacy than males. Meanwhile, males exhibited higher mathematics, computer, and social sciences self-efficacy than females. Gender differences in academic self-efficacy also varied with age. The largest effect size occurred for respondents aged over 23 years old. For mathematics self-efficacy, the significant gender differences emerged in late adolescence. Future research should longitudinally examine gender differences in academic self-efficacy to determine the prevalence of gender differences during different life stages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-35
Number of pages35
JournalEuropean Journal of Psychology of Education
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013 Feb 18

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
Meta-Analysis
gender-specific factors
Mathematics
moderator
Language Arts
mathematics
Social Sciences
computer science
adolescence
social science
art
language

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

@article{d887730fba6844989252326c42c201ad,
title = "Gender differences in academic self-efficacy: A meta-analysis",
abstract = "A meta-analysis of 187 studies containing 247 independent studies (N = 68,429) on gender differences in academic self-efficacy identified an overall effect size of 0.08, with a small difference favoring males. Moderator analysis demonstrated that content domain was a significant moderator in explaining effect size variation. Females displayed higher language arts self-efficacy than males. Meanwhile, males exhibited higher mathematics, computer, and social sciences self-efficacy than females. Gender differences in academic self-efficacy also varied with age. The largest effect size occurred for respondents aged over 23 years old. For mathematics self-efficacy, the significant gender differences emerged in late adolescence. Future research should longitudinally examine gender differences in academic self-efficacy to determine the prevalence of gender differences during different life stages.",
author = "Chiungjung Huang",
year = "2013",
month = "2",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1007/s10212-011-0097-y",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "1--35",
journal = "European Journal of Psychology of Education",
issn = "0256-2928",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "1",

}

Gender differences in academic self-efficacy : A meta-analysis. / Huang, Chiungjung.

In: European Journal of Psychology of Education, Vol. 28, No. 1, 18.02.2013, p. 1-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gender differences in academic self-efficacy

T2 - A meta-analysis

AU - Huang, Chiungjung

PY - 2013/2/18

Y1 - 2013/2/18

N2 - A meta-analysis of 187 studies containing 247 independent studies (N = 68,429) on gender differences in academic self-efficacy identified an overall effect size of 0.08, with a small difference favoring males. Moderator analysis demonstrated that content domain was a significant moderator in explaining effect size variation. Females displayed higher language arts self-efficacy than males. Meanwhile, males exhibited higher mathematics, computer, and social sciences self-efficacy than females. Gender differences in academic self-efficacy also varied with age. The largest effect size occurred for respondents aged over 23 years old. For mathematics self-efficacy, the significant gender differences emerged in late adolescence. Future research should longitudinally examine gender differences in academic self-efficacy to determine the prevalence of gender differences during different life stages.

AB - A meta-analysis of 187 studies containing 247 independent studies (N = 68,429) on gender differences in academic self-efficacy identified an overall effect size of 0.08, with a small difference favoring males. Moderator analysis demonstrated that content domain was a significant moderator in explaining effect size variation. Females displayed higher language arts self-efficacy than males. Meanwhile, males exhibited higher mathematics, computer, and social sciences self-efficacy than females. Gender differences in academic self-efficacy also varied with age. The largest effect size occurred for respondents aged over 23 years old. For mathematics self-efficacy, the significant gender differences emerged in late adolescence. Future research should longitudinally examine gender differences in academic self-efficacy to determine the prevalence of gender differences during different life stages.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84873695793&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84873695793&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10212-011-0097-y

DO - 10.1007/s10212-011-0097-y

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84873695793

VL - 28

SP - 1

EP - 35

JO - European Journal of Psychology of Education

JF - European Journal of Psychology of Education

SN - 0256-2928

IS - 1

ER -