Exploring the relationships between perceived coworker loafing and counterproductive work behaviors: The mediating role of a revenge motive

Tsang Kai Hung, Nai Wen Chi, Wan Lin Lu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this study is to explore the relationships between perceived coworker loafing and counterproductive work behaviors toward the organization (CWB-O) and toward the coworkers (CWB-I). Design/Methodology/Approach Data were collected from 184 supervisor-employee pairs from multiple sources (i.e., self-rated and supervisor-rated). Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses were conducted to test our hypotheses. Findings The results of SEM showed that perceived loafing was positively related to CWB-O (self-rated) and CWB-I (self-rated and supervisor-rated). Moreover, a revenge motive toward the organization fully mediated the relationship between perceived loafing and CWB-O, whereas a revenge motive toward coworkers fully mediated the relationship between perceived loafing and CWB-I. Implications This study advances our understanding as to how and why perceived coworker loafing increases employees' CWB-I and CWB-O. Our investigation also highlights the important cognitive mediator: revenge motive in the perceived loafing-CWB linkage. Originality/Value This is one of the first studies which examines the relationships between perceived coworker loafing and two facets of CWB, and investigates a cognitive mediator (i.e., a revenge motive) that underlines the perceived loafing-CWB linkage. In addition, we respond to Bennett and Robinson's (J Appl Psychol 85:349-360, 2003) call to test the nomological network of CWB in a collectivist culture (i.e., Taiwan).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)257-270
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Business and Psychology
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 Mar 1

Fingerprint

Taiwan
Counterproductive work behavior
Revenge
Supervisors
Employees
Mediator
Structural equation modeling
Linkage
Hypothesis test
Design methodology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Purpose The purpose of this study is to explore the relationships between perceived coworker loafing and counterproductive work behaviors toward the organization (CWB-O) and toward the coworkers (CWB-I). Design/Methodology/Approach Data were collected from 184 supervisor-employee pairs from multiple sources (i.e., self-rated and supervisor-rated). Structural equation modeling (SEM) analyses were conducted to test our hypotheses. Findings The results of SEM showed that perceived loafing was positively related to CWB-O (self-rated) and CWB-I (self-rated and supervisor-rated). Moreover, a revenge motive toward the organization fully mediated the relationship between perceived loafing and CWB-O, whereas a revenge motive toward coworkers fully mediated the relationship between perceived loafing and CWB-I. Implications This study advances our understanding as to how and why perceived coworker loafing increases employees' CWB-I and CWB-O. Our investigation also highlights the important cognitive mediator: revenge motive in the perceived loafing-CWB linkage. Originality/Value This is one of the first studies which examines the relationships between perceived coworker loafing and two facets of CWB, and investigates a cognitive mediator (i.e., a revenge motive) that underlines the perceived loafing-CWB linkage. In addition, we respond to Bennett and Robinson's (J Appl Psychol 85:349-360, 2003) call to test the nomological network of CWB in a collectivist culture (i.e., Taiwan).",
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Exploring the relationships between perceived coworker loafing and counterproductive work behaviors : The mediating role of a revenge motive. / Hung, Tsang Kai; Chi, Nai Wen; Lu, Wan Lin.

In: Journal of Business and Psychology, Vol. 24, No. 3, 01.03.2009, p. 257-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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