Examining the moderating effect of disability status on the relationship between trauma symptomatology and select career variables

David R. Strauser, Daniel C. Lustig, Ayşe Çiftçi Uruk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the current study, the authors examined whether the influence of trauma symptomatology on select career variables differs based on disability status. A total of 131 college students and 81 individuals with disabilities completed the Career Thoughts Inventory, My Vocational Situation, Developmental Work Personality Scale, and L.A. Symptom Checklist. The authors then conducted multiple regressions to examine interaction terms. These terms were not significant, suggesting that the influences of trauma clusters did not differ according to groups. Disability status made the largest unique contribution on all career variables. Among the trauma symptom clusters, Avoidance/Numbness had the broadest impact, with unique contributions on all of the career variables except CTI-CA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-101
Number of pages12
JournalRehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Dec 1

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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Examining the moderating effect of disability status on the relationship between trauma symptomatology and select career variables. / Strauser, David R.; Lustig, Daniel C.; Uruk, Ayşe Çiftçi.

In: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Vol. 49, No. 2, 01.12.2006, p. 90-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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