Differences in self-reported trauma symptomatology between individuals with and without disability: An exploratory analysis

David Strauser, Daniel C. Lustig, Ayse C. Uruk

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, the authors examined whether individuals with disabilities report higher levels of trauma symptoms than their nondisabled counterparts. Based on trauma theory and prior research regarding the incidence rate of posttraumatic stress disorder, the authors hypothesized that individuals with disabilities would report higher levels of trauma symptoms. Results partially supported the hypothesis, with women with disabilities reporting significantly higher levels of recalled trauma symptomatology when compared with men with disabilities and with men and women without disabilities. Men with disabilities did not report significantly higher levels of trauma symptoms when compared with men and women without disabilities. Effect sizes and confidence intervals were also computed for each analysis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)216-225
Number of pages10
JournalRehabilitation Counseling Bulletin
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007 Jun 1

Fingerprint

Wounds and Injuries
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Confidence Intervals
Incidence
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Rehabilitation
  • Applied Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{a5124799e5934b6f98e18feb4173f9fb,
title = "Differences in self-reported trauma symptomatology between individuals with and without disability: An exploratory analysis",
abstract = "In this study, the authors examined whether individuals with disabilities report higher levels of trauma symptoms than their nondisabled counterparts. Based on trauma theory and prior research regarding the incidence rate of posttraumatic stress disorder, the authors hypothesized that individuals with disabilities would report higher levels of trauma symptoms. Results partially supported the hypothesis, with women with disabilities reporting significantly higher levels of recalled trauma symptomatology when compared with men with disabilities and with men and women without disabilities. Men with disabilities did not report significantly higher levels of trauma symptoms when compared with men and women without disabilities. Effect sizes and confidence intervals were also computed for each analysis.",
author = "David Strauser and Lustig, {Daniel C.} and Uruk, {Ayse C.}",
year = "2007",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/00343552070500040301",
language = "English",
volume = "50",
pages = "216--225",
journal = "Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin",
issn = "0034-3552",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "4",

}

Differences in self-reported trauma symptomatology between individuals with and without disability : An exploratory analysis. / Strauser, David; Lustig, Daniel C.; Uruk, Ayse C.

In: Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin, Vol. 50, No. 4, 01.06.2007, p. 216-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differences in self-reported trauma symptomatology between individuals with and without disability

T2 - An exploratory analysis

AU - Strauser, David

AU - Lustig, Daniel C.

AU - Uruk, Ayse C.

PY - 2007/6/1

Y1 - 2007/6/1

N2 - In this study, the authors examined whether individuals with disabilities report higher levels of trauma symptoms than their nondisabled counterparts. Based on trauma theory and prior research regarding the incidence rate of posttraumatic stress disorder, the authors hypothesized that individuals with disabilities would report higher levels of trauma symptoms. Results partially supported the hypothesis, with women with disabilities reporting significantly higher levels of recalled trauma symptomatology when compared with men with disabilities and with men and women without disabilities. Men with disabilities did not report significantly higher levels of trauma symptoms when compared with men and women without disabilities. Effect sizes and confidence intervals were also computed for each analysis.

AB - In this study, the authors examined whether individuals with disabilities report higher levels of trauma symptoms than their nondisabled counterparts. Based on trauma theory and prior research regarding the incidence rate of posttraumatic stress disorder, the authors hypothesized that individuals with disabilities would report higher levels of trauma symptoms. Results partially supported the hypothesis, with women with disabilities reporting significantly higher levels of recalled trauma symptomatology when compared with men with disabilities and with men and women without disabilities. Men with disabilities did not report significantly higher levels of trauma symptoms when compared with men and women without disabilities. Effect sizes and confidence intervals were also computed for each analysis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34547186647&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34547186647&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/00343552070500040301

DO - 10.1177/00343552070500040301

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:34547186647

VL - 50

SP - 216

EP - 225

JO - Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin

JF - Rehabilitation Counseling Bulletin

SN - 0034-3552

IS - 4

ER -