Decolorization of azo dye and generation of electricity by microbial fuel cell with laccase-producing white-rot fungus on cathode

Chi Yung Lai, Chih Hung Wu, Chui Ting Meng, Chi Wen Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Wood-degrading white-rot fungi produce many extracellular enzymes, including the multi-copper oxidative enzyme laccase (EC 1.10.3.2). Laccase uses atmospheric oxygen as the electron acceptor to catalyze a one-electron oxidation reaction of phenolic compounds and therefore has the potential to simultaneously act as a cathode catalyst in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) and degrade azo dye pollutants. In this study, the laccase-producing white-rot fungus Ganoderma lucidum BCRC 36123 was planted on the cathode surface of a single-chamber MFC to degrade the azo dye acid orange 7 (AO7) synergistically with an anaerobic microbial community in the anode chamber. In a batch culture, the fungus used AO7 as the sole carbon source and produced laccase continuously, reaching a maximum activity of 20.3 ± 0.3 U/L on day 19 with a 77% decolorization of the dye (50 mg/L). During MFC operations, AO7 in the anolyte diffused across a layer of polyvinyl alcohol-hydrogel that separated the cathode membrane from the anode chamber, and served as a carbon source to support the growth of, and production of laccase by, the fungal mycelium that was planted on the cathode. In such MFCs, laccase-producing fungal cathodes outperformed laccase-free controls, yielding a maximum open-circuit voltage of 821 mV, a closed-circuit voltage of 394 mV with an external resistance of 1000 Ω, a maximum power density of 13.38 mW/m2, a maximum current density of 33 mA/m2, and a >90% decolorization of AO7. This study demonstrates the feasibility of growing a white-rot fungal culture with continuous laccase production on the cathode of MFCs to improve their electricity generation and azo dye removal efficiency.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)392-398
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Energy
Volume188
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017 Feb 15

Fingerprint

Microbial fuel cells
Azo dyes
fuel cell
Fungi
dye
electricity
Cathodes
Electricity
fungus
acid
Acids
enzyme
electron
carbon
Anodes
electricity generation
phenolic compound
Enzymes
density current
alcohol

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Building and Construction
  • Energy(all)
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

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title = "Decolorization of azo dye and generation of electricity by microbial fuel cell with laccase-producing white-rot fungus on cathode",
abstract = "Wood-degrading white-rot fungi produce many extracellular enzymes, including the multi-copper oxidative enzyme laccase (EC 1.10.3.2). Laccase uses atmospheric oxygen as the electron acceptor to catalyze a one-electron oxidation reaction of phenolic compounds and therefore has the potential to simultaneously act as a cathode catalyst in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) and degrade azo dye pollutants. In this study, the laccase-producing white-rot fungus Ganoderma lucidum BCRC 36123 was planted on the cathode surface of a single-chamber MFC to degrade the azo dye acid orange 7 (AO7) synergistically with an anaerobic microbial community in the anode chamber. In a batch culture, the fungus used AO7 as the sole carbon source and produced laccase continuously, reaching a maximum activity of 20.3 ± 0.3 U/L on day 19 with a 77{\%} decolorization of the dye (50 mg/L). During MFC operations, AO7 in the anolyte diffused across a layer of polyvinyl alcohol-hydrogel that separated the cathode membrane from the anode chamber, and served as a carbon source to support the growth of, and production of laccase by, the fungal mycelium that was planted on the cathode. In such MFCs, laccase-producing fungal cathodes outperformed laccase-free controls, yielding a maximum open-circuit voltage of 821 mV, a closed-circuit voltage of 394 mV with an external resistance of 1000 Ω, a maximum power density of 13.38 mW/m2, a maximum current density of 33 mA/m2, and a >90{\%} decolorization of AO7. This study demonstrates the feasibility of growing a white-rot fungal culture with continuous laccase production on the cathode of MFCs to improve their electricity generation and azo dye removal efficiency.",
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Decolorization of azo dye and generation of electricity by microbial fuel cell with laccase-producing white-rot fungus on cathode. / Lai, Chi Yung; Wu, Chih Hung; Meng, Chui Ting; Lin, Chi Wen.

In: Applied Energy, Vol. 188, 15.02.2017, p. 392-398.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Decolorization of azo dye and generation of electricity by microbial fuel cell with laccase-producing white-rot fungus on cathode

AU - Lai, Chi Yung

AU - Wu, Chih Hung

AU - Meng, Chui Ting

AU - Lin, Chi Wen

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AB - Wood-degrading white-rot fungi produce many extracellular enzymes, including the multi-copper oxidative enzyme laccase (EC 1.10.3.2). Laccase uses atmospheric oxygen as the electron acceptor to catalyze a one-electron oxidation reaction of phenolic compounds and therefore has the potential to simultaneously act as a cathode catalyst in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) and degrade azo dye pollutants. In this study, the laccase-producing white-rot fungus Ganoderma lucidum BCRC 36123 was planted on the cathode surface of a single-chamber MFC to degrade the azo dye acid orange 7 (AO7) synergistically with an anaerobic microbial community in the anode chamber. In a batch culture, the fungus used AO7 as the sole carbon source and produced laccase continuously, reaching a maximum activity of 20.3 ± 0.3 U/L on day 19 with a 77% decolorization of the dye (50 mg/L). During MFC operations, AO7 in the anolyte diffused across a layer of polyvinyl alcohol-hydrogel that separated the cathode membrane from the anode chamber, and served as a carbon source to support the growth of, and production of laccase by, the fungal mycelium that was planted on the cathode. In such MFCs, laccase-producing fungal cathodes outperformed laccase-free controls, yielding a maximum open-circuit voltage of 821 mV, a closed-circuit voltage of 394 mV with an external resistance of 1000 Ω, a maximum power density of 13.38 mW/m2, a maximum current density of 33 mA/m2, and a >90% decolorization of AO7. This study demonstrates the feasibility of growing a white-rot fungal culture with continuous laccase production on the cathode of MFCs to improve their electricity generation and azo dye removal efficiency.

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