Chinese Christians in America: Attachment to god, stress, and well-being

Meifen Wei, Tsun Yao Ku, Hwei Jane Chen, Nathaniel Wade, Kelly Yu Hsin Liao, Gwo-Jen Guo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined whether attachment to God moderated the relation between perceived stress and well-being (i.e., life satisfaction and positive affect) among 183 Chinese Christian international students and immigrants. Results showed significant main effects of (a) perceived stress on life satisfaction and (b) secure attachment to God and avoidant attachment to God on life satisfaction and positive affect. There was a significant interaction of perceived stress and avoidant attachment to God on life satisfaction. Specifically, high avoidant attachment to God exacerbated the association between perceived stress and life satisfaction, whereas low avoidant attachment to God buffered the association between perceived stress and life satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-180
Number of pages19
JournalCounseling and Values
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Oct 1

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Religious studies

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