Can multiple-choice questions simulate free-response questions?

Shih Yin Lin, Chandralekha Singh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We discuss a study to evaluate the extent to which free-response questions could be approximated by multiple-choice equivalents. Two carefully designed research-based multiple-choice questions were transformed into a free-response format and administered on the final exam in a calculus-based introductory physics course. The original multiple-choice questions were administered in another similar introductory physics course on final exam. Findings suggest that carefully designed multiple-choice questions can reflect the relative performance of the free-response questions while maintaining the benefits of ease of grading and quantitative analysis, especially if the different choices in the multiple-choice questions are weighted to reflect the different levels of understanding that students display.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2011 Physics Education Research Conference
Pages47-50
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012 Mar 1
Event2011 Physics Education Research Conference - Omaha, NE, United States
Duration: 2011 Aug 32011 Aug 4

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume1413
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Other

Other2011 Physics Education Research Conference
CountryUnited States
CityOmaha, NE
Period11-08-0311-08-04

Fingerprint

physics
calculus
students
quantitative analysis
format

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Lin, S. Y., & Singh, C. (2012). Can multiple-choice questions simulate free-response questions? In 2011 Physics Education Research Conference (pp. 47-50). (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 1413). https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3679990
Lin, Shih Yin ; Singh, Chandralekha. / Can multiple-choice questions simulate free-response questions?. 2011 Physics Education Research Conference. 2012. pp. 47-50 (AIP Conference Proceedings).
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Lin, SY & Singh, C 2012, Can multiple-choice questions simulate free-response questions? in 2011 Physics Education Research Conference. AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 1413, pp. 47-50, 2011 Physics Education Research Conference, Omaha, NE, United States, 11-08-03. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3679990

Can multiple-choice questions simulate free-response questions? / Lin, Shih Yin; Singh, Chandralekha.

2011 Physics Education Research Conference. 2012. p. 47-50 (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 1413).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Lin SY, Singh C. Can multiple-choice questions simulate free-response questions? In 2011 Physics Education Research Conference. 2012. p. 47-50. (AIP Conference Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3679990