Bridging realty to virtual reality: Investigating gender effect and student engagement on learning through video game play in an elementary school classroom

Leonard Annetta, Jennifer Mangrum, Shawn Holmes, Kimberly Collazo, Meng Tzu Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine students' learning of simple machines, a fifth-grade (ages 10-11) forces and motion unit, and student engagement using a teacher-created Multiplayer Educa-tional Gaming Application. This mixed-method study collected pre-test/post-test results to deter-mine student knowledge about simple machines. A survey ascertained the time spent using the computer for general purposes, and the time spent playing computer games as a function of gender. The pre-test and post-test design involved 74 students, 31 males and 43 females, who played the Dr. Friction Multiplayer Educational Gaming Application for several days in the middle of the unit. Results showed the females averaged using the computer more than their male counterparts and males played video games more than females. Analysis of covariance suggested no significant difference between the factor gender (p >.05) but statistically significant differences in gain scores (p =.001). Observations and qualitative focus groups suggested high student engagement and how video game technology can scaffold learning of simple machines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1091-1113
Number of pages23
JournalInternational Journal of Science Education
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009 May 1

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computer game
virtual reality
elementary school
classroom
gender
learning
student
teacher
Group
time

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

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Bridging realty to virtual reality : Investigating gender effect and student engagement on learning through video game play in an elementary school classroom. / Annetta, Leonard; Mangrum, Jennifer; Holmes, Shawn; Collazo, Kimberly; Cheng, Meng Tzu.

In: International Journal of Science Education, Vol. 31, No. 8, 01.05.2009, p. 1091-1113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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