A stress process model of caregiving for individuals with traumatic brain injury

Julie Chronister, Fong Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To test a stress process model of caregiving for persons with traumatic brain injury. Design: A correlational study using path analysis. Participants: One hundred eight caregivers affiliated with community- or Web-based support groups. Main Outcome Measures: The Modified Caregiver Appraisal Scale, the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief Version, the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List, and the COPE. Results: The normed fit index, comparative fit index, and parsimony ratio indicated a good fit for the model, suggesting that coping, social support, and caregiving appraisal contribute to quality of life. A more parsimonious model was respecified and achieved a better fit with fewer paths and variables. Conclusions: Empirical support was found for the proposed caregiving stress process model, which appears to provide useful information for future research and clinical interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)190-201
Number of pages12
JournalRehabilitation Psychology
Volume51
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006 Aug 1

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Caregivers
Quality of Life
Self-Help Groups
Exercise Test
Social Support
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Traumatic Brain Injury
N-succinyl-1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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A stress process model of caregiving for individuals with traumatic brain injury. / Chronister, Julie; Chan, Fong.

In: Rehabilitation Psychology, Vol. 51, No. 3, 01.08.2006, p. 190-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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