A criterion for identifying Asian dust events based on Al concentration data collected from northern Taiwan between 2002 and early 2007

Shih Chieh Hsu, Shaw Chen Liu, Yi Tang Huang, Shih Chun Candice Lung, Fujung Tsai, Jien Yi Tu, Shuh Ji Kao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We attempted to identify Asian dust (AD) events between February 2002 and February 2007 in northern Taiwan using aerosol Al measurements. We subsequently used the results to propose a criterion for defining AD events. A total of 30 AD events were detected based on Al spiking concentrations, and these occurred frequently in 2002 and 2006. The dust plumes that were identified occurred between November and April, which were concentrated in February, March, and April. There were 35 dusty days, which accounted for 1.89% of the whole study period, and for 3.75% when considering only November through April. The seasonality of atmospheric Al is quite evident, reaching a maximum in spring and winter and a minimum in summer. This pattern is related to the long-range transport of AD in the northeasterly monsoon and the cease of AD contributions, the efficient removal by heavy rain, and effective mixing in summer. According to air-mass trajectory analysis, the primary dust regions are located in and around the Gobi Desert and Loess Plateau. The geometric mean concentration of the data set excluding the AD cases is 502 ng m-3 with a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.8. On the basis of our success in identifying the major AD events, the "geometric mean ×2 GSD" (i.e., 2800 ng m-3 in our study area) is proposed as a straightforward criterion to define the significant AD event. As such, the statistic-based criterion could be applicable for other areas.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberD18306
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres
Volume113
Issue number18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008 Sep 27

Fingerprint

Taiwan
dust
Dust
summer
standard deviation
Gobi desert
Gobi Desert
trajectory analysis
spiking
monsoons
air masses
rain
long range transport
loess
aerosols
Aerosols
air mass
winter
trajectories
plumes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geophysics
  • Forestry
  • Oceanography
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

Hsu, Shih Chieh ; Liu, Shaw Chen ; Huang, Yi Tang ; Lung, Shih Chun Candice ; Tsai, Fujung ; Tu, Jien Yi ; Kao, Shuh Ji. / A criterion for identifying Asian dust events based on Al concentration data collected from northern Taiwan between 2002 and early 2007. In: Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres. 2008 ; Vol. 113, No. 18.
@article{9ead627fb2354873bc0dbc17d21c877c,
title = "A criterion for identifying Asian dust events based on Al concentration data collected from northern Taiwan between 2002 and early 2007",
abstract = "We attempted to identify Asian dust (AD) events between February 2002 and February 2007 in northern Taiwan using aerosol Al measurements. We subsequently used the results to propose a criterion for defining AD events. A total of 30 AD events were detected based on Al spiking concentrations, and these occurred frequently in 2002 and 2006. The dust plumes that were identified occurred between November and April, which were concentrated in February, March, and April. There were 35 dusty days, which accounted for 1.89{\%} of the whole study period, and for 3.75{\%} when considering only November through April. The seasonality of atmospheric Al is quite evident, reaching a maximum in spring and winter and a minimum in summer. This pattern is related to the long-range transport of AD in the northeasterly monsoon and the cease of AD contributions, the efficient removal by heavy rain, and effective mixing in summer. According to air-mass trajectory analysis, the primary dust regions are located in and around the Gobi Desert and Loess Plateau. The geometric mean concentration of the data set excluding the AD cases is 502 ng m-3 with a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.8. On the basis of our success in identifying the major AD events, the {"}geometric mean ×2 GSD{"} (i.e., 2800 ng m-3 in our study area) is proposed as a straightforward criterion to define the significant AD event. As such, the statistic-based criterion could be applicable for other areas.",
author = "Hsu, {Shih Chieh} and Liu, {Shaw Chen} and Huang, {Yi Tang} and Lung, {Shih Chun Candice} and Fujung Tsai and Tu, {Jien Yi} and Kao, {Shuh Ji}",
year = "2008",
month = "9",
day = "27",
doi = "10.1029/2007JD009574",
language = "English",
volume = "113",
journal = "Journal of Geophysical Research",
issn = "0148-0227",
publisher = "American Geophysical Union",
number = "18",

}

A criterion for identifying Asian dust events based on Al concentration data collected from northern Taiwan between 2002 and early 2007. / Hsu, Shih Chieh; Liu, Shaw Chen; Huang, Yi Tang; Lung, Shih Chun Candice; Tsai, Fujung; Tu, Jien Yi; Kao, Shuh Ji.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres, Vol. 113, No. 18, D18306, 27.09.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A criterion for identifying Asian dust events based on Al concentration data collected from northern Taiwan between 2002 and early 2007

AU - Hsu, Shih Chieh

AU - Liu, Shaw Chen

AU - Huang, Yi Tang

AU - Lung, Shih Chun Candice

AU - Tsai, Fujung

AU - Tu, Jien Yi

AU - Kao, Shuh Ji

PY - 2008/9/27

Y1 - 2008/9/27

N2 - We attempted to identify Asian dust (AD) events between February 2002 and February 2007 in northern Taiwan using aerosol Al measurements. We subsequently used the results to propose a criterion for defining AD events. A total of 30 AD events were detected based on Al spiking concentrations, and these occurred frequently in 2002 and 2006. The dust plumes that were identified occurred between November and April, which were concentrated in February, March, and April. There were 35 dusty days, which accounted for 1.89% of the whole study period, and for 3.75% when considering only November through April. The seasonality of atmospheric Al is quite evident, reaching a maximum in spring and winter and a minimum in summer. This pattern is related to the long-range transport of AD in the northeasterly monsoon and the cease of AD contributions, the efficient removal by heavy rain, and effective mixing in summer. According to air-mass trajectory analysis, the primary dust regions are located in and around the Gobi Desert and Loess Plateau. The geometric mean concentration of the data set excluding the AD cases is 502 ng m-3 with a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.8. On the basis of our success in identifying the major AD events, the "geometric mean ×2 GSD" (i.e., 2800 ng m-3 in our study area) is proposed as a straightforward criterion to define the significant AD event. As such, the statistic-based criterion could be applicable for other areas.

AB - We attempted to identify Asian dust (AD) events between February 2002 and February 2007 in northern Taiwan using aerosol Al measurements. We subsequently used the results to propose a criterion for defining AD events. A total of 30 AD events were detected based on Al spiking concentrations, and these occurred frequently in 2002 and 2006. The dust plumes that were identified occurred between November and April, which were concentrated in February, March, and April. There were 35 dusty days, which accounted for 1.89% of the whole study period, and for 3.75% when considering only November through April. The seasonality of atmospheric Al is quite evident, reaching a maximum in spring and winter and a minimum in summer. This pattern is related to the long-range transport of AD in the northeasterly monsoon and the cease of AD contributions, the efficient removal by heavy rain, and effective mixing in summer. According to air-mass trajectory analysis, the primary dust regions are located in and around the Gobi Desert and Loess Plateau. The geometric mean concentration of the data set excluding the AD cases is 502 ng m-3 with a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.8. On the basis of our success in identifying the major AD events, the "geometric mean ×2 GSD" (i.e., 2800 ng m-3 in our study area) is proposed as a straightforward criterion to define the significant AD event. As such, the statistic-based criterion could be applicable for other areas.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=56549121947&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=56549121947&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1029/2007JD009574

DO - 10.1029/2007JD009574

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:56549121947

VL - 113

JO - Journal of Geophysical Research

JF - Journal of Geophysical Research

SN - 0148-0227

IS - 18

M1 - D18306

ER -